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A historian lost her court bid on Friday to force Australian authorities to release secret letters that would reveal what Queen Elizabeth II knew of her representative's plan to dismiss Australia's government more than 40 years ago.

The National Archives of Australia has categorized the correspondence between the British monarch, who is also Australia's constitutional head of state, and Governor-General Sir John Kerr as "personal" and the letters might therefore never become public.

The Federal Court agreed the letters were "personal' and not state records, dismissing Monash University historian Jenny Hocking's application to have them made public. But Justice John Griffiths acknowledged in his judgment a legitimate public interest in the letters "which relate to one of the most controversial and tumultuous events in the modern history of the nation."

The letters would disclose what, if anything, the queen knew of Kerr's plan to dismiss Prime Minister Gough Whitlam's government in 1975 to resolve a month-old deadlock in Parliament.

Hocking, who wrote an acclaimed biography of Whitlam, described the ruling as "a disappointing decision for our history, specifically for the history of the dismissal which has long been cast in secrecy."

She has not ruled out appealing the decision. Hocking had been represented in the case free of charge by Whitlam's son, prominent lawyer Antony Whitlam.

The Archives, Buckingham Palace and the governor-general's official residence, Government House, have all previously declined AP's requests for comment on the case.

The fall of Whitlam's government is the only time in Australia's history a democratically elected federal government was dismissed on the British monarch's authority. Kerr's surprise intervention placed unprecedented strain on Australia's democracy and bolstered calls for the nation to split from its former colonial master by becoming a republic.

Hocking had argued the letters should be released regardless of the queen's wishes because Australians have a right to know their own history.

Without the "personal" classification, the letters could have become public 30 years after they were written like other government documents held in the Archives.

Massachusetts' high court will consider whether the state should get rid of a centuries-old legal principle that erased Aaron Hernandez's murder conviction after the former New England Patriots tight end killed himself.

The Supreme Judicial Court recently announced that it will hear the former NFL star's case and examine the legal principle under which courts typically dismiss the convictions of defendants who die before their direct appeals can be heard.

Hernandez's murder conviction in the killing of Odin Lloyd was dismissed after Hernandez was found hanging in his cell last year.

A single Supreme Judicial Court justice last year denied prosecutors' request to reinstate Hernandez's conviction. Hernandez was acquitted of killing Daniel de Abreu and Safiro Furtado days before his prison suicide.

Human rights groups say Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and his officials could still be prosecuted at the International Criminal Court for killings in his anti-drug war until his decision to withdraw from the tribunal takes effect after a year.

Presidential spokesman Harry Roque Jr. said Thursday that Duterte's decision was not meant to escape from any accountability but to protest an ICC prosecutor's decision to start examining a complaint against Duterte.

Duterte announced Wednesday that he was withdrawing the Philippine ratification of the Rome Statute "effective immediately." The statute established the tribunal.

Human Rights Watch says the ICC can still prosecute heinous crimes in the Philippines until its withdrawal takes effect a year after Duterte notifies the U.N. secretary-general.

A court established to prosecute crimes committed during and immediately after Kosovo's war for independence has issued the list of lawyers who will represent suspects, victims and others appearing before the tribunal.

The Kosovo Specialist Chambers on Wednesday said the 40 lawyers included on its list would ensure "effective and professional legal representation" before the KSC.

The Hague, Netherlands-based court, created by a 2015 law passed after U.S. and European pressure, has jurisdiction in Kosovo over alleged war crimes suspects from the 1998-1999 war and its immediate aftermath.

Kosovo detached from Serbia following a three-month NATO air war in 1999 to stop a bloody Serbian crackdown against ethnic Albanian separatists. Kosovo's 2008 independence is recognized by 117 states but not by Serbia.

A father testified in an Australian court Thursday that his son said he was sexually abused by Vatican Cardinal George Pell during a waterskiing outing years ago. When a defense lawyer accused him of lying, the father told the court it was an insult.

The testimony in the Melbourne Magistrate Court came at a hearing to determine whether prosecutors have sufficient evidence to put Pell on trial.

Pope Francis' former finance minister was charged in June with sexually abusing multiple people in his Australian home state of Victoria. The details of the allegations have yet to be released to the public, though police have described the charges as "historical," meaning they allegedly occurred decades ago.

Pell, 76, has said he will plead not guilty if the magistrate rules a jury trial is warranted.

The father of one of the alleged victims, who cannot be identified for legal reasons, testified via a video link that he first learned of the alleged abuse in 2015 and that his son struggled to talk about it.

Defense lawyer Robert Richter said the father did not name Pell in a statement he made to police then. "Do you have any explanation as to how it is there is no mention of Pell there, as having done anything wrong at the lake?" Richter asked.

The lawyer said the father had only recently named Pell as the alleged offender. "That's an invention of yours since July 2015 when you made your statement," Richter told the father.

last-ditch complaint filed by him.

It means that the justice minister can't finalize Yevgeniy Nikulin's extradition until the Constitutional Court rules on the matter.

Nikulin has exhausted all appeals, but his lawyers presented a final complaint to the court in a bid to postpone his extradition to either the U.S. or Russia. The contents of the complaint weren't made public, but Nikulin's defense has previously said that appeals court judges were biased.

Czech authorities arrested Nikulin in Prague in cooperation with the FBI in October 2016. He is accused by U.S. prosecutors of hacking computers at Silicon Valley firms including LinkedIn and Dropbox in 2012 and the U.S. wanted him extradited to face a trial there.

Moscow also wants him extradited on a separate charge of internet theft in 2009.

Both countries submitted their extradition requests on the same date.

Nikulin denies he's a hacker. His defense attorney claimed his case was politically motivated in the U.S.

Czech courts ruled that both extradition requests meet the necessary legal conditions, leaving the final decision to Justice Minister Robert Pelikan.

A Greek court on Wednesday rejected a Turkish extradition request for a young woman who was among nine suspected Turkish militants arrested in Athens ahead of an official visit by Turkey's president late last year.

A panel of three judges ruled 21-year-old Halaz Secer may be tried for issues other than what the extradition request sought her for and that her life could be in danger if returned to Turkey. The judges also ruled that some offences she was being sought for, such as participating in protests and making banners, were not crimes.

The nine, Turkish citizens of Kurdish origin, were arrested for alleged links to the left-wing Revolutionary People's Liberation Party-Front, which Turkey, the United States and the European Union consider a terrorist organization.

Secer is the third of the nine to see an extradition request from Turkey rejected. Two others - Naci Ozpolat, 48 and Mehmet Dogan, 60 - have also had the extradition request for them rejected in recent weeks.

After the hearing she returned to jail, where she is being held on Greek charges related to the possession of explosives. She denies being part of a terrorist organization.

Proesecutor Ourania Stathea had recommended the judges reject the extradition request, noting that charges for which Turkey was seeking Secer included "forming and running an armed terrorist organization since 2007," when she would have been 10 years old. Stathea noted Turkey has been under a state of emergency since July 2016, after a failed military coup there, which has led to the imprisonment of thousands of people, including civil servants, journalists, judges and military personnel.

Testifying in court, Secer insisted she was not a member of any terrorist organization, and said she had been protesting in Turkey to call for free education. The young woman said she has been arrested three times from the age of 17 for her activism, and held several months each time. She told the court she suffered injuries during each of the arrests.

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