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A French court ruled Thursday that Facebook failed to fulfill its contractual obligations by closing without prior notice the account of a user who posted a photo of a famous 19th century nude painting.

But the Paris civil court also refused to order the company to restore the account or pay damages as requested by the user, a primary school teacher and art lover. The court said no damages were warranted because he didn't prove any harm suffered due to the account's closure and there was no need to order the account reopened because he was able to set up a new account immediately.

The court also said the 60-year-old Parisian teacher, Frederic Durand-Baissas, didn't prove the deactivation was caused by his posting of the painting.

The judge wrote that Durand-Baissas also didn't provide evidence that he lost contact information for hundreds of "friends," as his lawyer argued during a trial last month.

The plaintiff claimed his profile was suspended in 2011 hours after he posted a photo of Gustave Courbet's "The Origin of the World," a painting from 1866 that depicts female genitalia. He asked the court to order Facebook to reactivate his initial account and to pay him 20,000 euros ($23,500) in damages.

His lawyer, Stephane Cottineau, said that the decision was disappointing and that he would appeal the ruling.

A historian lost her court bid on Friday to force Australian authorities to release secret letters that would reveal what Queen Elizabeth II knew of her representative's plan to dismiss Australia's government more than 40 years ago.

The National Archives of Australia has categorized the correspondence between the British monarch, who is also Australia's constitutional head of state, and Governor-General Sir John Kerr as "personal" and the letters might therefore never become public.

The Federal Court agreed the letters were "personal' and not state records, dismissing Monash University historian Jenny Hocking's application to have them made public. But Justice John Griffiths acknowledged in his judgment a legitimate public interest in the letters "which relate to one of the most controversial and tumultuous events in the modern history of the nation."

The letters would disclose what, if anything, the queen knew of Kerr's plan to dismiss Prime Minister Gough Whitlam's government in 1975 to resolve a month-old deadlock in Parliament.

Hocking, who wrote an acclaimed biography of Whitlam, described the ruling as "a disappointing decision for our history, specifically for the history of the dismissal which has long been cast in secrecy."

She has not ruled out appealing the decision. Hocking had been represented in the case free of charge by Whitlam's son, prominent lawyer Antony Whitlam.

The Archives, Buckingham Palace and the governor-general's official residence, Government House, have all previously declined AP's requests for comment on the case.

The fall of Whitlam's government is the only time in Australia's history a democratically elected federal government was dismissed on the British monarch's authority. Kerr's surprise intervention placed unprecedented strain on Australia's democracy and bolstered calls for the nation to split from its former colonial master by becoming a republic.

Hocking had argued the letters should be released regardless of the queen's wishes because Australians have a right to know their own history.

Without the "personal" classification, the letters could have become public 30 years after they were written like other government documents held in the Archives.

A court established to prosecute crimes committed during and immediately after Kosovo's war for independence has issued the list of lawyers who will represent suspects, victims and others appearing before the tribunal.

The Kosovo Specialist Chambers on Wednesday said the 40 lawyers included on its list would ensure "effective and professional legal representation" before the KSC.

The Hague, Netherlands-based court, created by a 2015 law passed after U.S. and European pressure, has jurisdiction in Kosovo over alleged war crimes suspects from the 1998-1999 war and its immediate aftermath.

Kosovo detached from Serbia following a three-month NATO air war in 1999 to stop a bloody Serbian crackdown against ethnic Albanian separatists. Kosovo's 2008 independence is recognized by 117 states but not by Serbia.

last-ditch complaint filed by him.

It means that the justice minister can't finalize Yevgeniy Nikulin's extradition until the Constitutional Court rules on the matter.

Nikulin has exhausted all appeals, but his lawyers presented a final complaint to the court in a bid to postpone his extradition to either the U.S. or Russia. The contents of the complaint weren't made public, but Nikulin's defense has previously said that appeals court judges were biased.

Czech authorities arrested Nikulin in Prague in cooperation with the FBI in October 2016. He is accused by U.S. prosecutors of hacking computers at Silicon Valley firms including LinkedIn and Dropbox in 2012 and the U.S. wanted him extradited to face a trial there.

Moscow also wants him extradited on a separate charge of internet theft in 2009.

Both countries submitted their extradition requests on the same date.

Nikulin denies he's a hacker. His defense attorney claimed his case was politically motivated in the U.S.

Czech courts ruled that both extradition requests meet the necessary legal conditions, leaving the final decision to Justice Minister Robert Pelikan.

Cambodia's Supreme Court has denied bail for an opposition leader charged with treason who is seeking to be released for medical treatment abroad.

The court ruled Friday that Kem Sokha must remain in pretrial detention for his own safety and because the investigation into his case is ongoing. His Cambodia National Rescue Party was dissolved last November by a court ruling on a complaint by Prime Minister Hun Sen's government.

Kem Sokha's case is widely regarded as a political setup by the government to cripple its opponents ahead of a general election this July. The party's dissolution was linked to the treason charge against Kem Sokha, for which he could be sentenced to up to 30 years in prison.

Kem Sokha's lawyers say he suffers from high blood pressure and diabetes, and has fallen sick in prison since being detained last September.

The court said if Kem Sokha is sick, the prison will arrange for a doctor to examine him inside the prison facility.

"If Kem Sokha is not allowed to have medical treatment at a hospital and in case he dies inside the prison, who will take responsibility? Are all of you responsible?" one of Kem Sokha's lawyers, Chea Cheng, asked the court.

The Phnom Penh Municipal Court this month granted a six-month extension for Kem Sokha's pre-trial detention period after the expiration of the initial six months. He has now been denied bail three times.

Kem Sokha was arrested last September on the basis of videos from several years ago showing him at a seminar where he spoke about receiving advice from U.S. pro-democracy groups. The opposition party has denied the treason allegation, saying the charge is politically motivated.

In the past several years the opposition party has faced an onslaught of legal challenges from Hun Sen's government with the support of the courts, which are generally seen as favoring his ruling Cambodian People's Party. Court rulings forced Sam Rainsy, Kem Sokha's predecessor as opposition leader, to remain in exile to avoid prison and pressured him into resigning from his party. Other top opposition party leaders fled Cambodia after Kem Sokha's jailing and the party's dissolution.

The Supreme Court of the Maldives delayed its order Sunday reinstating 12 pro-opposition lawmakers ahead of a key parliamentary sitting, the latest political turmoil to roil the island nation.

Opposition lawmaker Ahmed Mahloof said the government may call for important votes at a parliamentary sitting Monday to extend a state of emergency or dismiss two Supreme Court judges who have been arrested on allegations of corruption.

President Yameen Abdul Gayoom's ruling party may have lost a majority in the 85-member parliament if the 12 lawmakers were to be allowed to participate Monday.

The Maldives has faced upheaval since Feb. 1, when the Supreme Court ordered the release of Yameen's imprisoned political opponents and the reinstatement of 12 lawmakers sacked after they sided with the opposition.

The prisoners include Mohamed Nasheed, the country's first president elected in a free election, who could have been Yameen's main rival in his re-election bid later this year.

After days of conflict with the judiciary, Yameen declared a 15-day state of emergency and had the country's chief justice and another Supreme Court judge arrested on bribery allegations.

The American prosecutor working to bring to justice former members of the Kosovo Liberation Army accused of crimes against ethnic Serbs in Kosovo's war for independence is stepping down at the end of next month.

Specialist Prosecutor David Schwendiman issued a statement Thursday, saying he will leave the post at the end of March because his three-year term as a U.S. State Department foreign service officer is coming to an end and cannot be extended. -

Schwendiman says he issued the statement to make clear he was not resigning or being fired from his post.

His investigations aim to indict suspects who would then be put on trial at the Hague-based court known as the Kosovo Specialist Chambers. Schwendiman has not yet issued any indictments.

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